CapriCon 40 coming right up!

My first convention of 2020 is only 20 hours away!
CapriCon is happening February 13-16, 2020, Westin Hotel, Wheeling, IL

Several wonderful author friends are sharing a dealer’s room table with me. We have quite a variety of delightful books and book-related shiny things. Wait, let me try that again with more exclamatory excitement:
Seven authors! So many sub-genres! Meet us! Browse the pretties! Maybe buy a thing or two! (BUT NO PRESSURE!) 

I’ll be in several programs too, conveniently listed below. Plus Friday night at 5:30 I’ll be doing a a Book Speed-Dating event in room River C. Join the panelists for entertaining & thought-provoking discussions!

O Captain, My Captain
Thursday 6:30 PM
Room: Ravinia B
Join us as we recognize women in roles of leadership in SF/F. Captain Janeway, Commander Ivanova (who is ALWAYS right), Captain Marvel, Admiral Honor Harrington, and Captain “Starbuck” Thrace demonstrate that it’s not strictly a “boy’s club” anymore. Who are your favorite women in leadership roles in SF/F? Your inspirations?

Nonfiction for Fiction Writers
Friday 10:00 AM
Room: Botanic A
We often hear writers advised to read widely, both in and out of our genre. What are some kinds of nonfiction reading that can help broaden your fiction writing? Our panelists recommend memoirs, history, cookbooks, podcasts, subreddits, true crime, whatever else has caught their interest and driven them to write more deeply.

Just Deserts
Friday 11:30 AM
Room: Ravinia B
Tropics doesn’t just mean Caribbean islands or fabulous tropical rainforests. Deserts are part of the tropics too. Many recent fantasy stories have desert settings, many bearing more than a passing resemblance to North Africa. Camels, beautiful horses, long robes, independent tribes, and more than a little misogyny fill these stories. Can we do anything else with desert settings? What other societies could develop there?

The Future Climate of Chicago and the Midwest
Saturday 11:30 AM, Room: Willow B
What do global warming trends predict for Chicago and the Midwest? As our local climate becomes more tropical, what will the impacts be on people, plants, animals and our environment?

Pirates are Not Just in the Caribbean
Saturday 2:30 PM
Room: Botanic A
Captain Dan Seavey stole lumber, alcohol and even whole ships right in Lake Michigan. Piracy was a global phenomenon that persists to this day. Our panelists discuss the past and future of global piracy. Why do we romanticize historical pirates, who were often really vicious bad guys? What does modern day piracy say about the socioeconomic impacts of the world we live in? Is climate change playing a role?

So Bad it’s Good
Saturday 8:30 PM
Room: Willow B
Our panelists discuss their favorite “so bad it’s good” films. And what about supposedly “good” movies that are actually bad?

When not at these events, I’ll be most easily found in the Dealer Room.  This is a super-friendly, super-fun, convention. I’m excited about meeting new friends and catching up with old ones.

See y’all on the other side of the con.

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Image by adamtepl from Pixabay

 

Two random thoughts

…because I am awake at ridiculous o’clock  (thank you, abrupt weather changes, for these fantastic joint aches and this fabulous itch-behind-the-eyes headache-ish thing that cancelled my sleep after only two hours)

AND I’m behind on blogging, so here I am, filling time and space.

Random thing the first: a realization about genderthink

It all started way back when I read Anne Leckie’s Imperial Radch series. It blew my mind in several ways, all excellent and glorious.  The biggest impression it left was the foundational nature of gendering assumptions.  It was HARD wrapping my brain around the default pronoun being she/her. Such a simple concept was far more difficult to process than I anticipated.  WORTH IT, though. Such a good book.

The read cut and polished new facets into my worldview.

Most of my life, when I saw an identifier like, “his cousin,” in a book I was reading, I would assume that cousin was male until given a name or other information that indicated otherwise.  And to be honest, if it was a side character, or a bit player, no such information would ever be offered. So in my mind, all the random NPCs in fiction ended up being male by default.

That doesn’t happen any more. In the last few years my default assumption has changed to female.  I noticed this reading something today where cousins were referenced several times before being gendered. Learning they were boys jarred me right out of the narrative. I had just assumed…a completely opposite assumption than in the past.

A lot of terms do not require or include gender (like cousin, or manager, accountant, neighbor or staffer versus aunt or uncle, ) There’s zero reason to default to a male identity other than cultural expectations. And expectations can change.

I’ve got no conclusion here, it’s just a thing I noticed.

Random idea the second: why isn’t mothering a job?

What would the world be like if we treated mothering as an activity rather than a gender-chained identity?  I fear I’m missing some huge meaningful Spiritual aspect of Motherhood or inadvertently insulting millions by asking that question,  but there it is.

There’s a lot of mystical, magical malarkey associated with being “A MOM” that seems to only apply when the job is done by a FEMALE presenting person. And I don’t think perpetuating those ideas is good or healthy for anyone with a mothering gig.

Maybe I’m missing something here, but mothering is a set of definable actions.**  Mothering is a thing one does. It doesn’t even entirely require a child, although I would submit that is the prime example of it. Strip away the cultural gender baggage, and the whole thing gets much simpler and healthier.

So I’m amusing myself picturing a world where Mother or Mom is a just a job title meaning “person or persons whose social role is primary child nurturer.”  This also creates an opening for Father/Dad to be an action-defined role too. Maybe it becomes the term for the secondary nurturer or nurturers–the one or ones who nurture the primary child nurturer, for example, or contribute to the social unit in other ways.

(I’ll leave details to someone more clever and well-rested than I feel right now.)

This random thought was sparked by reading an article on “stay at home dads” and the different expectations placed on them, and thinking to myself, hang on, how much of this whole problem is the labeling? If their primary job is taking care of the kids, the meals, the wash, the home finances, the scheduling and so on, then they’re doing the mom job, so why aren’t they stay-at-home-moms?

And I suspect the answer is, “That would make too many people feel unmanly.” Which kinda indicates there’s gender-baggage, and that’s why it tickles my imagination to ponder a world where a dude proudly calls himself Mom, and a woman answers to Dad.

ANYway.

Totally random stuff. And that’s all there is, so I’ll wrap it here.  G’night. Or good morning. Whatever.

 

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and here is a random chicken image.

**Yes, any activity or job can also be an identity, but the dangerous nature of tying identity to specific work is a topic for a whole ‘nother post.

 

October Word 5

Today’s timed act of typing

October 5. Malady

There’s a problem with malady, and it’s that I have to process the word before I can write about the meaning of it, Words dance, now and then. I’m not diagnosed dyslexic, but…words don’t always behave well. Malady NEVER looks right. There’s something wrong about it. There’s some amusement value there, no? Malady suffers from a malady? Anyway, I’ve misspelled it three times.  But I don’t misspell “misspell.” Go figure. Nothing wrong with my spelling. And now I’ve nearly run out of time and I didn’t even get to complain about malady being a mealymouthed, fainthearted kind of a word for describing being sick…and now Im’ wondering about the origin of the word mealymouthed and I’ve run out of time.